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Gene Louis had spent 26 years as a small businessman, concentrating in the areas of music and computing. In 1988, he published "Street Smart Computing". It was designed to help small businessmen to efficiently use the newly affordable microcomputers to maximize their profits.
 
A few years later, after he began to initiate a lifelong dream to develop an organic food production operation with an aquaculture (fish) component, he was diverted into a sea of horrors as he was unwillingly dragged into a net of legal frustration.
 
After thousands of hours of litigation, research, and analysis, he had enough credible information to warn the consumer public about the dangers of the legal system.
 
Gene has degrees in media communications, computer science, marketing, and business administration. In addition to publishing "Street Smart Computing" and "Survival of the Slickest", he also examined the potential of using network marketing as a legitimate method of distribution. Later, he switched topics and examined the negative economic and social implications of the income tax.
 
His major non-professional interests include natural health, music performance, talk radio, Scriptural application, tropical fish, and listening to jazz.
 
In his writings, Gene reflects his curiosity of how the  availability of free markets influence the quality of life in America.
 
Survival of the Slickest was written for the general public - average Americans who do not have any idea of what really happens in law schools and in courtrooms. Because it was written from the viewpoint of a non-lawyer, it does not automatically promote the politically correct message that treats the current private legal monopoly as a sacred treasure that must be preserved at all costs.
 
This think-out-of-the-box viewpoint makes the book especially valuable because it questions the validity of presumptions that the general public usually supports without question.

I didn't want to write "Survival of the Slickest".

 

The research, analysis, and writing were emotionally draining because of a convoluted legal system that had no relationship to my perceptions of its purpose.

 

I didn't want to devote my valuable time and money to promote the truth about citizen abuse in return for expected citizen apathy. I didn't want to face the probable attacks from a group of businessmen who I was trying to put back on track. There was no logical reason to take my valuable time away from other activities that I considered more constructive and more interesting.

 

But I could not justify the costly risks that would be required to continue pursuing my lifelong goals. There would be no guarantee that the legal trade would leave me alone long enough to enjoy the fruits of success that might result from my continued labors and dreams.  

 

It would be more productive to warn the consumer public. The legal trade has institutionalized their anti-American business practices without any serious challenges, even while many individuals and groups provide unwarranted praise for an illusion of justice that makes this profession respectable. 

 

Politicians who are supposed to be representative watchdogs ignore any serious attempts to solve the real problems because they have more important goals. They must concentrate on attracting large sums of money to pay for thier valuable campaigns. When they go to work, they work with the legal trade that helps keep them in business.

 

Anyone who does not want to face these truths will hate "Survival of the Slickest". That's OK, because these people have no value to society.  

 

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